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Changing Tires - Help me guys.

So I bought a Harbor Frieght tire changer with the motorcycle attachment, but took it back because it was scratching my rims and the center post did not fit my axil.  So I am now playing with taking the tires off and letting the dealer change and balance, but even for that they want $50 a wheel. I've been researching utube and the Sevice Manual which show they can be changed with some tire shoe irons.  Breaking the bead is another issue.  So what I have now come up with is using Motion Pro Breaker Tire irons.  They look doable, but wondered if any of you have used them or have further information on the best method to do this.  Here's the product I am refering to:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-MOTION-PRO-Beadpro-Tire-Bead-Breaker-Lever-T...

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19 Comments

The one "trick" I used to use was to set the wheel and tire on a open metal trash can. That way I could work standing up.You can add weight to the can to keep it in place.

I got tired of wrestling the wheel around the floor so I just let the tire shop change them. $25.00 per wheel mounted and balanced. I bring in my own tires. Tire irons work OK but are kind of a pain to use. You may need a Bead buster which is a clamp that clamps down on the bead at the rim. Once this is done you can get the tire irons in between the wheel and tire. Then just remove it like a bicycle tire. Then you get to do it all over in reverse. Then you get to balance the assembly. Have fun

I go to the shop and let them do it. When I buy the new tires at the shop it's all included, and the tires are the same price as buying them somewhere else, so it's just a great service!

Ya here in la la land the dealer wants $30-$50 a wheel. Unfortunately no motorcycle tire service is reasonable here and I have to drive through 30 minutes of backed up traffic to get to a reasonable shop. Changing a tire shouldn't be a big deal, I know I can do the front but the rear will take some effort. I'm not sure, I may buy the reference bead breaker and irons to see...I'll let you know. It would be nice to do them quickly. Here is a youtube video of the refernced product...what do you think?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAKIuSjPXxA

la la land ha think again just had new tires put on by a harley shop price of tires and mount and balance and put on the bike,
a whopping $884.00 dollars so in my book take your tires and rims in and get them mounted $30 to 40 dollars cheap for half the price lol

I'm with Gert. It's almost always cheaper to buy the tires at the shop and have them do the work. Besides doing it yourself is too much like work. The shop I deal with and most in my area charge the list price in the parts unlimited catalog for mounted and balanced. Ride in ride out

Well I bought my tires for $208 delivered. Be nice to be able to install at will cheaply, that way I can change them more often rather than riding them to bald city for the dreaded tire fee. After taken them off yourself, most of work is done, now drive 45 minutes drop off and drive again 45 minutes to pick up and pay, albeit $60. While if you could do it yourself you could spend an hour reinstall and never have to open the wallet. Just saying.

I found a wheel balancer for the vstar 1100

http://www.sears.com/venom-motorcycle-tire-wheel-balancer-rim-truing-sta...

They make a balancing compound that goes inside the mounted tire and balances the tire for the life of the tire
Don't need those archaic balancers any more.
Works well

Yes, but are you sure it works. I don't see how beads rolling around on the inside of your tire really do anything.

I was talked into using the beads on my 07 Stratoliner. Both new front and rear. The tires started to cup real bad only after 3000 miles and the back was all worn out at 4500 miles. The back was cupping bad also. The tires started to wobble and bounce. I have used the same brand of tires and air pressure for the last 15 years. This is the only time I have ever had any issues with tire wear or balancing. Once I removed the beads and installed new tires and balanced the old archaic way I have never had any issues with tire wear or cupping. For me the beads are a waste of time and tires. I have always got between 9-10,000 miles on a set of tires. I ride hard most all the time. Those that ride with me know. I run through two sets of tires a year on average. Drew if it were my tires I would use the old lead weights. They always work. They don't look so good but who cares, not me.

Thanks Scruffy, I haven't heard anything negative on them except from you; but I agree that if you can't visualize how they work, I should stay away. I don't believe in magic beads. So I've had some discussion on the tire change subject and think I am going to get Harbor Freight bead breaker $40, Venom Tire Balancer (for Vstar 1100) $58, and three Harbor freight long tire irons $15. And some rim protectors. $10. If all goes well I will have everything I need for a yearly tire change.

The tools should make the tire swap a little easier for you. The good thing is that now you have all the tools so the next set will almost free to change.

Edwins your link doesn't work.

Try it now.

I should start a wheel balancing shop? Damn, might be worth living in Kansas City for reasonable tire changes.

Actually Scruffy, I may try the Dynna beads for $20 and see if they work. That'll bring my cost down to $70. Then next change if they didn't work well I buy the wheel balancer for $60. Then they'll be free there after, well almost free.

Try it they may work for your set up. But the way I ride the beads are always on the side walls of the tire. That is the only thing I can think of why both front and rear started cupping at the same time. I don't spend much time riding straight up and down. With the roads around here and the crown we have. It just seems weird that the only time I ever used the beads the tires went south in a hurry. Have never had an issue since. I Hope they work out for you.

put a couple of 2x4s on the ground, apart to fit the disk between when laying flat, slide it under the bumper of a truck, put a wood on the top of the tire and us a handy man jack(widow-maker) to break the bead, put the base of the jack on the wood and start jacking, get someone heavy to stand on the other side of the tire. and use some lube or windex to lube

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