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Vstar 1100 Engine rebuild

Situation:  Gasket leak.  Retorqued head bolts, still leaks.  Using Lucas stop leaks, still leaks but still using (note: Lucas Stop leak does not affect clutch)  Please review my preliminary plan and see if you can add information, links, and red flags.

Preliminary plan to fix:

1. Unbolt engine and turn sideways, leaving on frame and staping it down.
2. Remove Cylinder head (one cylinder at a time complete all work before working on other)
3. Remove Cylinder
4. Change pistons to high preformance 10.6 to 1 compression - the plan is to not do any work at crankshaft.  Simply change piston heads and rings.        A ring compressor which will allow removal from piston shaft will be needed.  I will be dropping cylinder over pistons. (ideas?)
5. Replace valve springs with higher spring compression.  Will I need a spring compressor?
6. New valve if needed  new oil seals.
7. New high lift CAM
8. New gaskets with high temperature gasket sealer.  Ideas? Flags?
9. Re-install engine.
10. New performance exhaust with new gaskets.

I am currently developing the plan.  Any help is appreciated.

Topic:

48 Comments

Come on Edwins, dig deeper.

I'll make a list for you tomorrow, Take a picture of the ring compressor i use. It's not high tech but it works the best and is easy to use and setup. I Have used Pacific coast star they have good stuff but sometimes it takes a while to get you your stuff. They are here in Spokane, WA. Sometimes you get your stuff right away.It is a little two man show and they both have day jobs. They have been doing this for about 10-15 years. The prices are very good.

Okay, for starters. Why leave the engine in the frame? Years back, I visited a HD engine builders shop where I saw what I think was a great idea. The guy took a wrecked frame and cut it down to just the bottom mounts and seat post. It was bolted to a wooden stand with a pair off wheels so that when tilted back in cound be moved like a hand truck. The seat post had a bracket welded on so a small gas container could be hung and he had made a wiring set set up for a start and ignition system.
He could disassemble, rebuild and test all on the stand.
Some nice part diagrams
http://yamaha.mymcparts.com/Yamaha_2008_V-STAR1100SILVERADO.html
Valve spring compressor. Note the wide price range for the same set. http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=motorcycle+valve+spring+compressor
As you may have guessed, I love pictures. So, Chapter 4 is for you.
http://www.flygenring.dk/Yamaha/xvs1100/XVS_1100_Clymer.pdf
http://www.webcamshafts.com/mobile/motorcycle/yamaha/yamaha_xvs_1100_v_s...(99-09)_sohc_4v.html
http://www.sloneservices.com/SilverBack/Other-Stuff/cam-install-1a-check...
Just a little info. Hope it helps.
Scruffy is the Man.

Leaving the engine of the frame will reduce the effort needed. Pulling the engine to a stand would be nicer to work from. I have considered building a stand from 2x4's, but this is all upper engine work. I am shooting for easiest way to do it. In the Clymers it shows the engine just set on the ground. I want it strapped down to something.
I was hoping there was no valve spring compressor needed. But good good to know I need one.
Nice Clymers! The cam install should be easy peasy while head is off.

What type of gasket sealer do you recommend for cylinder and head. I was thinking Permatex Maximum Temp. Resistance Copper RTV Silicone Sealant, 3 oz

I am most worried that my front head is warped beyond the limits. I see ebay has some used if I need one for $70-120.

REMOVING THE VALVES
The following procedure applies to all of the
valves and related components.
Before removing the internal parts of the cylin-
der head (e.g., valves, valve springs, valve
seats), make sure that the valves properly seal.
1. Check:

valve sealing
Leakage at the valve seat

Check the valve
face, valve seat, and valve seat width.
Refer to “CHECKING THE VALVE SEATS”.
a. Pour a clean solvent
1
into the intake and
exhaust ports.
b. Check that the valves properly seal.
There should be no leakage at the valve seat
2
.
2. Remove:

valve cotters
Remove the valve cotters by compressing the
valve spring with the valve spring compressor
1
.
Valve spring compressor
YM-04019, 90890-04019
AND NOW THE ARGUMENT STARTER
From the Knowledge Base site.
"CLEAN ALL SURFACES TO READY THEM FOR NEW GASKETS. DO NOT USE ANY TYPE OF GASKET MAKER OR SEALER WITH THESE NEW GASKETS, AND CHECK THAT ALL THE SPACERS AND DOWL GUIDES ARE IN THERE HOLES ON THE HEAD AND CYLINDER. REFER TO THE MANUAL"
The can of worms has been opened.
My opinion is that if the surface is scratched, use a sealer.
I tried to find out what Yamaha says but, they ain't talking.
I see no mention of searler in the manuals.
That's funny cause they sell YamaBond.

When going thru mechanic's training we were taught to use a thin line of silicon sealer equaly spaced between the edges so as to NOT get any inside the engine. Why? Because sealer plugs holes and oil passages are holes.

Yamaha gasket failed, so I don't want to do this again. A thin layer of sealer is in the plan. At least on the head to cylinder where it has been leaking. But I will have to decide at the time, they may be free of scratches and warpage. Glancing through Clymers there may be a tool for checking valve seat and seal. But I am still researching. Great info.

A question: How do I secure valve from dropping down when I use the spring compressor to attach clip which is to secure it?

ARRRRG! Now your trying to make me think. Got to oil the gears. lol

Well I think I can put a wood block under them while doing it....don't overtax yourself...I need you thinking good. Plus Scruffy should have some good thoughts.

This is the 650 manual but the second picture on page 21, chapter 4 is what your looking for.
http://braindump.donfick.com/media/9d/Yamaha%20v-Star%20650%20Shop%20Man...

That's a pretty fancy spring compressor. Same one for the vstar 1100 I see. The cheapest spring compressor YM-04019 that I could find is $170. Thats not going to work, so I have to find an Universal one. Ok take a break have some beer, and I'll think some more. Thanks.

Drew: I am posting some pictures of the ring compressors I use. From big to small.If you are going to use any kind of sealer on the head gaskets use Copper Coat Paint. With real copper in it.not just copper color. Give the head gasket a couple coats on each side and let dry for at least two days. Then be very careful not to scratch the paint or it may leak at the scratch.
For silicone sealer use GM Black or Permatex Ultra Black #82180. This stuff works. Use very little on any surface. .010 -.020 any more than that is just a waist and it gets int places you really don't want. This stuff will seal while in oil and antifreeze. not recommended.
The ring compressor I use is only about $20 or less works every time. I have never broken a ring with it. The one with the red handle. Get a real Yamaha manual it will tell you stuff that the cheap $20 don't.
Pictures Posted. Take a look DREW

Bring it on. I am re-writing my plan. The red handle dosen't look like it will open up so i can remove it. Please clarify.

http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/oyster_stew/

The copper paint works. My Dad had me paint gaskets for him and we would hang them up to dry.Old school works because you had to get it right the first time. I like having both manuals. The factory one for info and the other ones for photos. I also use grease on paper gaskets because paper gaskets have to swell in order to seal. Used a stainless steel head gasket on my Alfa.

GM Black or Permatex Ultra Black #82180, Does it have copper in it? This stuff seems to have copper, Permatex Maximum Temp. Resistance Copper RTV Silicone Sealant. So Scruffy, what do you think is best for head gasket?

A rough estimate has me doing this work, 85 hours.

Gasket paint. I've used this. https://www.permatex.com/products/gasketing/gasket-sealants/permatex-cop... or at least its older form.
One thing that people forget to do is re-torque the base and head bolts after the first run. Wait until the engine has cooled and follow the proper tightening sequence.

Spray-on? Do I spray it on gasket or on metal, sounds like I would have to mask it for a spray onto metal. Re-torquing those that I can access.

Looking over the torque specs, I am surprized they are so low....15 ft/lbs, 27 ft/lbs, and 50 ft/lbs.

Most of the work is getting the motor unbolted and positioned for the mod. I kinda want to start it now, but I want to ride. I need another bike. At least I feel confident to do this, although a little overwhelmed with the amount of work to access the heads. I could just replace the gasket $50 or do the engine upgrade $1100. I think for the amount of work, I ought to do some thing that improves the bike. Anyway the information given is great and I thank you guys.

Little concerned the universal valve spring compressor wont be the right size, but I figure I can epoxy some steel cross bars on them to make contract with valve spring collar. Tin and some screw clamps for ring compression.

FYI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VISqGGMcBTc

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Lisle-Wrinkle-Band-Ring-Compressor-4-Ways-Better...
You will be lowering the cylinder over the piston.

.

Yes that why I was looking for one that disassembles so that it can come off shaft. The one you are referencing will not work unless it comes off. I haven't seen that it will...will it?

Update: ok it does I found a picture of it seperating, so it's the one to get.

Good man. The right parts, the right tools, the right information and a good workspace. Remember if things don't seem right;STOP. walk away and clear your mind. What seemed to be a problem may turn into a Oh, thats what it is moment. What I couldn't do in all of yesterday got done in no time the next morning.
I've smacked myself for being a dumba-- many a time. Take lots of pictures when your taking it apart so you don't have to guess what went where.Marbe even make a video of the entire process as I don't seem to see any on the net. That's my sermon for this week. lol

You were reading my mind. Don't worry we'll be discussing it further when I start it, so don't go anywhere. Lots a pictures, maybe video since there no pull the engine video on vstar 1100 that I can find. I am also design an engine stand made of 2x4's with a false side so the jack can roll out of it when returning motor to frame, if I can't find a way to work off the frame.

Drew I never use any silicone sealer on any internal gaskets where there is an oil port or water passage.. If you're going to use it use the permatex ultra black it is the best or go to CAT and get there sealer RED. That stuff will seal anything but never use the Cat GREEN sealer that CAT makes. It is the best BUT when you want to remove anything you glued on with it forget it.
The fact that the silicone can get dislodged at any time and plug up an oil galley bothers me. If you must use it do so very sparingly. I mean put a dab on your finger and spread it until you can't see it on the gasket. It will still be there but it won't have the excess the squeezes out all over the place.
When I was working ?? rebuilding engines and tranny's and stuff if you used any silicone with Cummins, Detroit, Cat, and other they would not warranty their parts. I Have done lots of engines and seen lots of blown up because of silicone lodged in the oil gallies and oil pump. Have fun with your rebuild.

Yeah, Wayne. That's like Loctite. They make a bunch of products and most people figure Loctite is Loctite. Sleeve retainer is good for 3000 psi. I don't think I could get that loose.

Revised Draft Plan "A" Z cams

Hours: 106 Total Cost: $2635

Leadtime for Cams - 6 weeks.
This modification will require the use of Premium gas, rather than regular.

1 Build Engine stand 2x4’s (3 hours)
2 Drain oil
3 Jack up and set bike on block and strap. (2 hours)
4 Remove side covers, saddle bags, exhaust, chrome items, gas tank, seats, ORK. (3 hours)
5 Remove Crash bars, neck covers, all items off lower frame, hang brake reservoir at rear bungee. (4 hours)
6 Disconnect electrical battery cables from engine, wire connectors at fuses, cables to engine, speed sensor (3 hours)
7 Pull rear tire let spline rest on ground, re-attach axil (2 hours)
8 Remove Carburetor and install new 150 main jets. (3 hours)
9 Review for readiness to remove engine mounts
10 Remove engine mounts in order as per Service Manual 4-4 Set floor jack to support engine. (5 hours)
11 Roll engine to Engine stand, secure and strap. Set up over head support for cam chain. (2 hours)
12 Remove Oil pipe lines and engine mount brackets. (1 hour)
13 Set to TOC for front cylinder, set wrench to hold flywheel from movement. (30 minutes)
14 Remove cam covers, break loose cam bolt, remove cylinder head bolts, remove cylinder head while maintaining cam chain support. (2 hours)
15 Disassemble Cylinder Head, check Valve seat, warpage, remove old gasket, inspect. (5 hours)
16 Install new valve seals, and springs. Re-assemble rocker and gasket. Install new cam. (4 hours)
17 Remove Cylinder bolts, Tensioner, and remove Cylinder while supporting Cam chain. Cover openings to crankshaft. Inspect Cylinder and remove old gasket. (3 hours)
18 Remove Piston. Install new Piston rings in new Piston. Install new Piston, set and protect new Cylinder gasket. (3 hours)
19 Oil up Piston, Cylinder and install Cylinder, and chain guide, while maintaining support for cam chain. Remove covers from gasket and crankcase openings. (2 hours)
20 Set new Cylinder head gasket, set Cylinder Head while maintaining cam chain support. (2 hours)
21 Snug down Cylinder bolts, and Cylinder Head bolts alternating. Tighten bolts alternating to 35% of torque, then 60%, then 100%, and then 100%. (1 hour)
22 Re-attach Cam sprocket and torque down to specs. Install Tensioner and gasket and reset Tensioner. Cam cover plate. Front Cylinder complete. (2 hours)
23 Set to TOC for rear cylinder, set wrench to hold flywheel from movement. (30 minutes)
24 Remove cam covers, break loose cam bolt, remove cylinder head bolts, remove cylinder head while maintaining cam chain support. (2 hours)
25 Disassemble Cylinder Head, check Valve seat, warpage, remove old gasket, inspect. (5 hours)
26 Install new valve seals, and springs. Re-assemble rocker and gasket. Install new cam. (4 hours)
27 Remove Cylinder bolts, Tensioner, and remove Cylinder while supporting Cam chain. Cover openings to crankshaft. Inspect Cylinder and remove old gasket. (3 hours)
28 Remove Piston. Install new Piston rings in new Piston. Install new Piston, set and protect new Cylinder gasket. (3 hours)
29 Oil up Piston, Cylinder and install Cylinder, and chain guide, while maintaining support for cam chain. Remove covers from gasket and crankcase openings. (2 hours)
30 Set new Cylinder head gasket, set Cylinder Head while maintaining cam chain support. (2 hours)
31 Snug down Cylinder bolts, and Cylinder Head bolts alternating. Tighten bolts alternating to 35% of torque, then 60%, then 100%, and then 100%. (1 hour)
32 Re-attach Cam sprocket and torque down to specs. Install Tensioner and gasket and reset Tensioner. Cam cover plate. Rear Cylinder complete. (2 hours)
33 Reinstall Oil pipe lines with new seals. Install Front Engine mounting brackets. (2 hours)
34 Roll Engine to frame and support with floor jack while re-installing Engine mounts per Service Manual 4-5. Torque to specs. Re-attached frame opening bars. (6 hours)
35 Re-attach rear tire and spline. (2 hours)
36 Re-install carburetor. (3 hours)
37 Re-connect electrical battery cables from engine, wire connectors at fuses, cables to engine, speed sensor (4 hours)
38 Re-install Crash bars, neck covers, all items off lower frame, and brake reservoir. (6 hours)
39 Re-install side covers, saddle bags, exhaust, chrome items, gas tank, seats, ORK. (4 hours)
40 Jack up and remove block and straps. (2 hours)
41 New oil and oil filter. (30 minutes)
42 Pre-start up procedures.
43 Hot/Cold cycles three times.
44 Ride normally for 50 miles.
45 Drain oil and filter. (1 hour)
46 New oil and filter.
47 Break in.

Equipment:
Craftsman tools $200
Motorcycle lift $100
Rolling jack $80
Engine blocking for stand $60
Straps $40
Really good 3/8” torque Wrench $100
Valve spring compressor $30
Slide hammer $40

Total Equipment: $650

Parts:
High Performance package, 10.6 to 1 Piston, rings, high lift cam, springs, $1090
High performance Exhaust "V Star 1100 Monster Bomber Exhaust" $580
Gasket sealer $15
Gaskets $100
Oil pipe seals $20
Grease $10
Oil $90
Oil Filter $30
Valve seals $30
Misc clips $20

Total Parts: $1985

Retorque?

I can only re-torque the bolts I have access to. Once the engine is installed i can only re-torque two base cylinder bolt and two at head cylinder. Please elaborate when and what i should re-torque.

I forgot to remove carburetor, shoot. Well it's a draft.

Mounts. Have you decided to go the with the perfomance upgrades?

Not entirely as I am looking at the amount of work. But I remain open to it. Certainly open to it as a winter project. Item 33 mounts.

Plan B - to fix leak only

82 Hours Total Cost $690

1. Drain oil (30 minutes)
2. Jack up and set bike on block and strap. (2 hours)
3. Remove side covers, saddle bags, exhaust, chrome items, gas tank, seats, ORK. (4 hours)
4. Remove Crash bars, neck covers, all items off lower frame, hang brake reservoir at rear bungee. (4 hours)
5. Disconnect electrical battery cables from engine, wire connectors at fuses, cables to engine, speed sensor (3 hours)
6. Pull rear tire let spline rest on ground, re-attach axil ( 2 hours)
7. Remove Carburetor and install new 150 main jets. ( 4 hours)
8. Review for readiness to remove engine mounts
9. Remove engine mounts in order as per Service Manual 4-4 Set floor jack to support engine. (8 hours)
10. Turn engine, secure and strap to frame. Set up over head support for cam chain. ( 4 hours)
11. Remove Oil pipe lines and engine mount brackets. (1 hour)
12. Set to TOC for front cylinder, set wrench to hold flywheel from movement. (30 minutes)
13. Remove cam cover, break loose cam bolt, remove cylinder head bolts, remove cylinder head while maintaining cam chain support. (5 hours)
14. Inspect Cylinder Head, check Valve seat, warpage, remove old gasket. ( 5 hours)
15. Set new Cylinder head gasket, set Cylinder Head while maintaining cam chain support. ( 1 hour)
16. Snug Cylinder Head bolts alternating. Tighten bolts alternating to 35% of torque, then 60%, then 100%, and then 100%. ( 2 hours)
17. Re-attach Cam sprocket and torque down to specs. Install Tensioner and gasket and reset Tensioner. Cam cover plate. Front Cylinder complete. (3 hours)
18. Reinstall Oil pipe lines with new seals. Install Front Engine mounting brackets. (1 hour)
19. Turn Engine to frame and support with floor jack while re-installing Engine mounts per Service Manual 4-5. Torque to specs. ( 5 hours)
20. Re-attach rear tire and spline. (2 hours)
21. Re-install carburetor. (3 hours)
22. Re-connect electrical battery cables from engine, wire connectors at fuses, cables to engine, speed sensor ( 4 hours)
23. Re-install Crash bars, neck covers, all items off lower frame, and brake reservoir. (6 hours)
24. Re-install side covers, saddle bags, exhaust, chrome items, gas tank, seats, ORK. (4 hours)
25. Jack up and remove block and straps. (2 hours)
26. New oil and oil filter. ( 2 hours)

Equipment:
Craftsman tools $200
Motorcycle lift $100
Rolling jack $80
Engine blocking $30
Straps $40
Really good 3/8” torque Wrench $100
Total Equipment: $550
Parts:
Gasket sealer $15
Gaskets $30
Oil pipe seals $20
Grease $10
Oil $50
Oil Filter $15
Total Parts: $140

Edwins that CAT green is worse than any locktite. I have the pleasure of changing a water pump on a NT 400 cummins. Someone used an extra dose of the stuff. I managed to remove the pump without damaging the block but it was not a two hr. job. It took 8+ hrs. I had to chisel the dang thing off with hammer and chisel. ONLY use Cat green when you really never intend to remove that item.

The only things I can think of using that on are all of evil intent. LOL

Edwins and Scruffy, Guys,
I have decided on this lift for use as a jack and engine stand, FYI...do you agree?

http://www.sears.com/craftsman-professional-1500-lb-motorcycle-atv-jack/...

I purchased a bit ago a 120-960 inch/lbs torque wrench...a little dissappointed in how you set it, but it worked. What type of torque wrench to you recommend? This is what I have:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/261657774280?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&ssPage...

Also need a slide hammer, but thats not as important.

If I buy a new one i want a split beam click torque wrench. Would actually like have one for in/lbs and one for ft/lbs
The only problem I can see with that jack is people wanting to borrow it.

Plan C - to fix leak, install cams x2.

86 Hours Total Cost $1610

1. Drain oil (30 minutes)
2. Jack up and set bike on block and strap. (2 hours)
3. Remove side covers, saddle bags, exhaust, chrome items, gas tank, seats, ORK. (4 hours)
4. Remove Crash bars, neck covers, all items off lower frame, hang brake reservoir at rear bungee. (4 hours)
5. Disconnect electrical battery cables from engine, wire connectors at fuses, cables to engine, speed sensor (3 hours)
6. Pull rear tire let spline rest on ground, re-attach axil ( 2 hours)
7. Remove Carburetor and install new 150 main jets. ( 4 hours)
8. Review for readiness to remove engine mounts
9. Remove engine mounts in order as per Service Manual 4-4 Set floor jack to support engine. (8 hours)
10. Turn engine, secure and strap to frame. Set up over head support for cam chain. ( 4 hours)
11. Remove Oil pipe lines and engine mount brackets. (1 hour)
12. Set to TOC for front cylinder, set wrench to hold flywheel from movement. (30 minutes)
13. Remove cam cover, break loose cam bolt, remove cylinder head bolts, remove cylinder head while maintaining cam chain support. (5 hours)
14. Inspect Cylinder Head, check Valve seat, warpage, remove old gasket. Install Cam x2 ( 7 hours)
15. Set new Cylinder head gasket, set Cylinder Head while maintaining cam chain support. ( 1 hour)
16. Snug Cylinder Head bolts alternating. Tighten bolts alternating to 35% of torque, then 60%, then 100%, and then 100%. ( 2 hours)
17. Re-attach Cam sprocket and torque down to specs. Install Tensioner and gasket and reset Tensioner. Cam cover plate. Front Cylinder complete. (3 hours)
18. Install Cam x2 rear cylinder.Reinstall Oil pipe lines with new seals. Install Front Engine mounting brackets. (3 hours)
19. Turn Engine to frame and support with floor jack while re-installing Engine mounts per Service Manual 4-5. Torque to specs. ( 5 hours)
20. Re-attach rear tire and spline. (2 hours)
21. Re-install carburetor. (3 hours)
22. Re-connect electrical battery cables from engine, wire connectors at fuses, cables to engine, speed sensor ( 4 hours)
23. Re-install Crash bars, neck covers, all items off lower frame, and brake reservoir. (6 hours)
24. Re-install side covers, saddle bags, exhaust, chrome items, gas tank, seats, ORK. (4 hours)
25. Jack up and remove block and straps. (2 hours)
26. New oil and oil filter. ( 2 hours)

Equipment:
Craftsman tools $200
Motorcycle lift $100
Rolling jack $80
Engine blocking $30
Straps $40
Really good 3/8” torque Wrench $100
Total Equipment: $550
Parts:
X2 cams $345
High performance Exhaust "V Star 1100 Monster Bomber Exhaust" $580
Gasket sealer $15
Gaskets $30
Oil pipe seals $20
Grease $10
Oil $50
Oil Filter $15
Total Parts: $1075

You have too many plans; I have the same lift x2 and 2 table lifts. Once you find the right spot on the bike the little scissor style work great for 75% of all work on your bike. I use them for brakes and tire changes. They are good for polishing and washing the wheels. Once you get one you'll wonder why you didn't get it sooner.
I have two, 200 in lb torque wrenches one a click style and one 200 in lb dial style. I have a 600, 300 , 200 ft lb torque wrenches these are all click style. Work great. Just remember to loosen the tension on the spring before putting in storage. I have found that the cheap ones work ok for 90% of the time Just double check them now and then like all torque wrenches.

A few more tools that you will need :
A set of dial bore gauges to measure cylinder wear and taper - you don't want to install new pistons in cylinders that may be out of specification. Also used to measure valve guides.
A micrometer or caliper to measure other components such as valve stems. A dial indicator will be necessary to measure run-out on the valve stems. Feeler gauges to measure the gaps on the piston rings (they may need to be filed some for proper fit) and valve lash. And let's not forget a valve lapping tool and lapping compound. If you don't already have them, you will need gauges (vacuum) to synchronize the carbs as well as an alternate fuel tank so you can run your bike with the tank off. I have one that holds a few quarts of fuel and has a hook to hang it up and a hose with a petcock to feed the carbs while the tank is off of the frame. If you shop around, you should be able to get all of these things for around $500-$600. Good luck!

What was I thinking? I completely forgot about a precision straight edge. You will use that in conjunction with feeler gauges to check the cylinder head for warping. If the heads have any warping beyond allowable limits, they will leak even with new gaskets.

Scruffy, never stop the planning process while your not committed. I am still deciding, but plan A is growing on me. Gracielou, the bike has 24,000 miles and I am only going to check out the cylinder head per the manual. I have a synchronizer which I use leaving the gas tank just set on top for fuel. I have feeler guages and new piston rings in plan A. This is all about a head gasket leak, not a rebuild on engine with 120000 miles.

Perhaps you can recommend a precision straight edge as I have found online only stainless steel rulers. I will buy off ebay a new head if it is beyond limits for $70-120. The service manual says to sand them with wet sand paper to return them to usable if not beyond limits.

Drew, I'd be delighted to! Here is one from Snap-On tools - https://store.snapon.com/Precision-Straight-Edges-Straight-Edge-Precisio...
I have a Snap-On one like this and it comes in really handy. I know they aren't cheap, but a quality straight edge is cheaper than having to tear down the engine again if either of the heads have warping. Hope your rebuild goes well. Smiley-laughing

I am beginning to see that you are a high maintenance biker girl. I think for one time need i will go with:
http://www.sears.com/ludwig-precision-aluminum-straight-edge/p-SPM129703...

Drew get a list of tools you may need and I'll send them to you unless you want to spend over 800$ in tools you will only use once. We can set up a meet up or freight them to you when you're ready.

I let you know if there's something I need. I need to buy some things anyway for my use. But I will let you know. Thanks.

Yes, you should definitely go with that straight edge from Sears. That is a great idea.

I am going with plan C. None of those performance adds require pulling the engine, so if they arrive late I can install them after. I am happy with the performance the bike has now and these performance upgrades will add 10-15 horsepower, which will put me a little further into my happy zone.

At the suggestion from Edwins, I will make a picture pamphlet on how to remove and re-install engine, with all my lessons learned and successes. I am planning to start the project at the end of May with the hope it will be completed by July 1st so I can attend the "Hells Canyon Rally" with a smooth running, oil leak free bike.

Let the wrenching begin.

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